Region IV Public Health Training Center

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Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on April 19, 2019. Training Overview The increasingly diverse and multicultural 21st century US population requires health departments to be deliberate when it comes to ensuring their programs, services, practices and policies do not reinforce health inequities and disparities. A "one-size-fits-all" approach to public health is no longer sufficient or acceptable. How can health departments increase organizational cultural competence in order to advance health equity and mitigate the social determinants of health? During this 90-minute webinar, participants will discuss cultural competence as an important component of successful implementation of public health programing, services, practices and policies, as well as, how it can contribute to the elimination of health disparities existing within populations served by health departments. We will examine the existing sociocultural barriers (organizational, structural, and clinical) in health departments driving disparities in health status and health outcomes. The webinar’s content and dialogue will be guided by the National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) in Health and Health Care, Human Impact Partners (HIP) recommendations for the Public Health Accreditation Board on Advancing Health Equity in Health Department’s Public Health Practice, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainer Hermence Matsotsa, MPH Hermence Matsotsa, MPH, is Founder / Principal Consultant of UbuntuSpeaks, LLC - a leading U.S.- based firm that specializes in global health workforce development cross / intercultural communication, team building and employee engagement training consulting. Ms. Matsotsa has more than 15 years of professional experience in global health, infectious disease prevention, treatment and outbreak response (HIV/AIDS, TB, Polio, sexually transmitted infections, Ebola, Malaria, and Cholera).  As well as, women and gender development, family planning, reproductive health and public health policy.   Ms. Matsotsa has a Master’s in Public Health (MPH) from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Bachelor’s in International Affairs from Mary Washington College and Adult Education Certification from the University of the District of Columbia. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a lecture held in 2012. Training Overview What is this lecture about? Health literacy is essential for successful access to care and use of services, self-care of chronic conditions, and maintenance of health and wellness. Health literacy is fundamental to healthcare that requires individuals to have a more active role in decisions and management. The IOM reports that 90 million people, nearly half our adult population, lack health literacy skills needed to understand and act on health information and health system demands. Only 12% of U.S. adults have the health literacy proficiency to perform complex health tasks such as using a table to calculate an employee’s share of health insurance costs. Join us for updates on the latest research findings, policy implications, and hands-on tools for addressing the problem. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainer Kara Jacobson received her public health training at the Rollins School of Public Health. She has integrated public health prevention strategies into clinical primary care setting with an emphasis on chronic disease prevention including smoking cessation, physical activity, and nutrition programs primarily for seniors. In addition to development, implementation, and evaluation of successful behavior modification programs, Ms. Jacobson has served as the Director for Grady’s Patient Education Committee. In this position, she provided guidance and leadership for the development and review of patient education materials for the entire health system that were culturally sensitive and of low literacy level. Additionally, she has trained physicians at both Emory and Morehouse School of Medicine on the importance of integrating lifestyle counseling into clinical practice. Kara served as the Director for Educational Programs, Research, and Development for the National Office of the Arthritis Foundation. Currently, she conducts studies that address health literacy interventions and chronic disease self-management programs. She has worked at the American College of Physicians Foundation on improving prescription bottle labels for patients and serves as the literacy consultant to industry and public health institutions. She also teaches a course here at the Rollins School of Public Health: “Health Literacy Importance as a Public Health Problem”. Dr. Ruth Parker is a professor of medicine with pediatrics and also at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. She is nationally and internationally recognized for her research, educational, and advocacy efforts to advance health literacy. She was the co-investigator on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Literacy and Healthcare Project and helped develop the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults, the TOFHLA. She co-authored the Definition of Health Literacy for Healthy People 2010 for the Institute of Medicine and NIH and has authored many scholarly pieces on health literacy. She served in leadership roles for professional societies including the AMA, the ACP Foundation, and has consulted with many federal and state agencies. She was a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Health Literacy Committee and is currently a member of their health literacy roundtable. She has received national recognition for her work including the Silver Achievement Award from the AAMC and the Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Award from the ACP in 2005 as well as the FDA Advisory Committee Service Award in 2008. In 2011, she was named national associate of the National Research Council for the National Academies. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This workshop has limited capacity. If you are unable to enroll, the course might be full. This is an online, interactive workshop on October 21, 2021 from 8:45am-12pm ET. Participants will use Zoom to join with both video and audio. This workshop is sponsored by The Region IV Public Health Training Center.   Training Description: “Great vision without great people is irrelevant.” – Jim Collins In an environment where the stakes are high such as in public health, how leaders develop their teams makes all the difference in long-term success. Positive relationships between leaders, emerging leaders and team members can be transformational. The result is a team competent, confident, and optimistic about their potential and contribution to the vision and goals of an organization.  Thus, leaders who employ strategic human resource management contribute to this transformation.  Such practices can include but are not limited to strategic selection, appraisal, and development of team members.  This collaborative learning experience is designed for new and experienced leaders to reflect on and recharge their leadership development skills for the mutual benefit of their most valuable resources and the organization. About the Trainer: Nina M. Johnson, LMSW, APTD, develops, delivers, and evaluates leadership development programming and trainings for communities and organizations at the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development at the University of Georgia. Nina has 15 consecutive years of professional experience in learning and talent development for communities, not-for-profit organizations, and government municipality. As a skilled communicator, Nina has a history of implementing innovative programs focused on learner needs and performance enhancement. Utilizing her experience as a social worker, Nina employs exceptional relationship-building skills to connect with communities and clients with honor and respect to design and implement leadership initiatives that are reflective of the needs and capacity of the community. Much of Nina’s work encourages and empowers leaders and potential leaders to access emotional intelligence, vulnerability, hope, and authenticity as leadership tools. It is through the aforementioned experiences and leadership qualities Nina displays her ability to harness the power of human connection to accelerate leadership potential. Prior to joining the Fanning Institute, Nina served at the DC Department of Employment Services, establishing the agency’s first Office of Training and Professional Development. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a lecture held on February 25, 2014. Training Overview This presentation will focus on immunization in Georgia.  Dr. Patrick O’Neal, Director of Health Protection in the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) and Mr. Steve Mitchell, Georgia Immunization Director with DPH will provide an overview of the value of immunization for community resilience and efforts by DPH to improve vaccine coverage statewide, particularly in those ages 3 and under.   The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainer J. Patrick O’Neal, MD, and Steve Mitchell, MPH Over the years Dr. O'Neal's role has expanded and currently he is functioning as the Director of Health Protection in the Georgia Department of Public Health.  He has oversight responsibility for EMS, Trauma, Injury Prevention, Emergency Preparedness, Epidemiology, the Georgia Public Health Laboratories, Environmental Health, Infectious Diseases and Immunizations, Refugee Health, Public Health Volunteer Programs, and the Office of Pharmacy. Steve Mitchell holds a Bachelor of Science Degree from Morehouse College and a Master in Public Health from Mercer University School of Medicine.  Previously, he served as a Captain in the U.S. Air Force and was the Public Health Flight Commander for Patrick Air Force Base located in Melbourne, Florida.  As Flight Commander, he was responsible for all aspects of preventive medicine which included:  Immunizations, Deployment Medicine, Communicable Disease, Environmental Health and Occupational Health and Safety. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on January 11, 2021. Training Overview Child sexual abuse prevention starts with knowledge and awareness of the problem. This webinar provides professionals who work with children and families with an overview of the issue as well as tools and strategies to create safer environments for children in both a professional and personal setting. The webinar will cover practical actions adults can take to reduce instances of child sexual abuse in their organizations, families, and communities, and will give participants information about evidence-informed training programs available to deepen knowledge and enhance skill building to prepare adults to speak up and prevent sex abuse. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainer Tiffany Sawyer, Director of Prevention Services Tiffany Sawyer joined the Georgia Center for Child Advocacy as the Director of Prevention Services in 2006.  In her capacity at the Georgia Center, Tiffany oversees the Center’s statewide abuse and exploitation prevention initiative, which has trained over 150,000 adults.  Prior to her work in Georgia, Tiffany worked at Darkness to Light where she assisted in the creation of the Stewards of Children training curriculum and helped to launch the program on national and international levels.  She continues to serve as a curricula advisor and featured program expert for Darkness to Light through their Stewards of Children training video and other training modules. Sawyer served as the 2019 President of the National Coalition to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse and Exploitation and continues to serve on the Executive Committee.  She was appointed by Governor Nathan Deal in August 2014 to serve on the Georgia Child Fatality Review Panel as the Prevention Specialist. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a lecture held on July 26, 2012. Training Overview Each year, billions of U.S. tax dollars are spent on research and hundreds of billions are spent on service delivery programs. However, relatively little is spent on, or known about, how best to ensure that the lessons learned from research inform and improve the quality of health and human services and the availability and utilization of evidence-based approaches. In the context of increased interest and investment in comparative effectiveness research that will help to determine the optimal and/or most cost-effective interventions to be used in clinical and community healthcare practice, it is essential that both clinical and public health practitioners are equipped with empirically-supported strategies to integrate scientific knowledge and effective interventions into everyday use. The National Institutes of Health have recognized that closing the gap between research discovery and program delivery is both a complex challenge and an absolute necessity if we are to ensure that all populations benefit from the Nation’s investments in new scientific discoveries. This lecture will focus on approaches to moving research into public health practice and policy. With an understanding of the importance of implementation science, challenges for improving efficient and meaningful translation will be discussed and dissemination and implementation frameworks will be highlighted along with examples and useful tools for both researchers and public health practitioners. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainer Cynthia Vinson, MPA In her current position she works on building and sustaining the field of implementation science in order to enhance the integration of evidence-based guidelines, programs, and policies for cancer control in public health and clinical practice. She is responsible for working both within NCI and with other agencies and organizations at the international, national, state and local level to translate research funded by DCCPS into practice. In this capacity she has worked to develop and implement the Cancer Control P.L.A.N.E.T. (Plan, Link, Act, Network with Evidence-based Tools) web portal, the Research-tested Interventions Program website and the new Research to Reality community of practice in the US. Working collaboratively with the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer she has been able to facilitate the development of a Canadian version of the Cancer Control P.L.A.N.E.T.. Prior to her work at NCI she worked as a health education volunteer for the Peace Corps in Gabon, Central Africa. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

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