Region IV Public Health Training Center

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Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on May 27, 2020. Training Overview COVID-19 has highlighted the critical role that public health plays in the US and it also has demonstrated that this virus does not affect everyone equally. While it has affected the lives of all Americans, some racial and ethnic groups have been more likely to contract and die from COVID-19 than others. In this webinar, we will discuss some of the biological, behavioral and contextual factors that affect COVID-19 transmission and severity, and what public health professionals can and have been doing to reduce the impact of this virus on individuals and communities.  The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainers Dr. Derek M. Griffith is Professor of Medicine, Health and Society, and he is the Founder and Director of the Center for Research on Men’s Health at Vanderbilt University. Trained in psychology and public health, Dr. Griffith has collaborated with colleagues in Canada, Ireland, New Zealand and the United States promote the health and well-being of African American and Latino men, to address institutional racism in public health departments and systems, and to pursue health equity. Dr. Griffith is a contributor to and editor of two recent books – Men’s Health Equity: A Handbook, and Racism: Science and Tools for the Public Health Professional. Dr. Caldwell is a seasoned public health leader who currently serves as the Nashville and Metro Davidson County Director of Public Health and Chief Medical Officer. Prior to his current role, Dr. Caldwell served for 19 years as the Commissioner of Health for Dutchess County, NY, the home of Franklin & Eleanor Roosevelt.      This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on March 1, 2021. Training Overview During this webinar we will discuss racism and social determinants of health, and the role bias plays in healthcare decision making as well as its impact on adverse health outcomes. We will discuss how our backgrounds inform our perspectives and how we relate to colleagues and patients. We will also explore strategies that students and physicians can employ to mitigate bias.   The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainer Dr. Bussey-Jones is a Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine of Emory University’s School of Medicine.  She received her BS in Sociology and later her MD from Emory University. She currently serves as the Chief of Grady General Medicine and Geriatrics, the Vice-Chair for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion for the Department of Medicine, and the Director of Education for Emory’s Urban Health Initiative – leading community-based participatory programming and training of health professionals to improve the health and decrease disparities among diverse populations in Atlanta.   Dr. Bussey-Jones has nationally recognized educational expertise in the areas of minority health, health equity, as well as patient and provider education.  She has developed several program initiatives addressing health promotion and disease prevention for vulnerable populations.  She developed and directed curricula on cultural competence,  This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on June 15, 2020. Training Overview In this presentation, we’ll discuss the nature and dynamics of sex and labor trafficking, and the health impact on adults and children.  We’ll review possible indicators of trafficking that may be present under varied conditions, and discuss screening tools that may be helpful in identifying persons at risk of exploitation.  We’ll talk about the trauma-informed, rights-based approach to interacting with trafficked persons, and review resources available to those in need.  Finally, we’ll discuss how the COVID pandemic is expected to impact the dynamics of human trafficking and exacerbate existing risk factors for exploitation. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainer Jordan Greenbaum, MD, received her medical degree from Yale School of Medicine and is board-certified in anatomic and forensic pathology. She served as the medical director of the child protection program at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin from 2001-2006 and the medical director of the Stephanie V. Blank Center for Safe and Healthy Children at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta from 2006-2015. She is the Medical Director of the International Centre for Missing and Exploited Children on their Global Health Initiative. She co-chairs the Education/Training committee for HEAL Trafficking, an organization of professionals working on human trafficking issues.  Her research focuses on designing and validating a screening tool to be used in healthcare settings to identify youth at risk for trafficking/sexual exploitation. She is a long-time member of the International Society on the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect and helps lead their anti-trafficking initiative. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on June 10, 2019. Training Overview This webinar presents evidence that religion should be considered among the social determinants of health, based on epidemiological research.  Plausible mechanisms at the individual level are the lower smoking rates and greater social ties of those with religious participation.  At the community level, faith-based organizations engage in partnerships with public health agencies as a source of social capital to promote health and prevent disease, particularly in hard-to-reach populations. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainers Dr. Idler holds additional appointments at Emory at the Rollins School of Public Health, the Center for Ethics, the Graduate Division of Religion of the Laney Graduate School, and the School of Medicine.  She received her Ph.D. from Yale University and attended Union Theological Seminary on a Rockefeller Brothers Fellowship. She studies the influence of attitudes, beliefs, and social connections on health, including the effect of self-ratings of health on mortality and disability, and the impact of religious participation on health and the timing of death among the elderly. Ms. Kiser joined the Interfaith Health Program in 1993 during its first seven years at The Carter Center and continues that work now at the school of public health.  She teaches interdisciplinary courses at Emory in faith and health, religion and development, and social justice.  Ms. Kiser has led the Academic Programs Working Group for Emory’s Religion and Public Health Collaborative. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on August 31, 2020. Training Overview As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, schools across the country are deciding how to begin the 2020-21 school year, whether for in-person instruction, virtual learning, or a hybrid approach. In this webinar, health and education experts from the Center for American Progress will discuss the current state of school reopenings, considerations for local officials making decisions about reopening, and related health and education research. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainers Maura Calsyn is the managing director of Health Policy at American Progress. In this capacity, she plays a leading role in American Progress’ health policy development and advocacy efforts. She has authored and co-authored work published in The New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA Internal Medicine, U.S. News & World Report, and The Hill. Scott Sargrad is the vice president of K-12 Education Policy at American Progress. Prior to joining American Progress, Sargrad served as deputy assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education at the U.S. Department of Education under then-Education Secretary Arne Duncan, as well as the acting director of the Office of School Turnaround. He joined the Education Department in 2009 as a presidential management fellow in the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services and also worked as a senior policy adviser in the Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development.  This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This workshop has limited capacity. If you are unable to enroll, the course might be full. This is an online, interactive workshop on December 9, 2021 from 8:45am-12pm ET. Participants will use Zoom to join with both video and audio. This workshop is sponsored by The Region IV Public Health Training Center.   Training Description: Studies show that managers spend upwards of 30% of their time dealing with conflict in the workplace. Conflict is not something that can or should be eliminated, but rather is something that skilled professionals can manage for greater productivity. This interactive workshop will present ways in which public health professionals can better understand the sources of conflict and strategies for managing conflict to work toward productive rather than destructive outcomes.  Participants will apply their learning of conflict styles and the way the brain works through conflict to examples from their own work experiences. About the Trainer: Brandy Brown Walker, Ph.D. is Public Service Associate at the J.W. Fanning Institute for Leadership Development at the University of Georgia. At the Fanning Institute, Brandy designs, develops and helps facilitate training for youth and adult leadership programs. She specializes in instructional design, technology, and community-engaged research and oversees the institute’s curriculum webinars and online leadership training. Brandy brings her expertise in adult learning, curriculum design, and instructional technology to bear in designing, developing, and delivering leadership programs for youth and adults, and her work in curriculum design and program development bridges education, research and service in a variety of ways. Through a Service-Learning fellowship, Brandy designed a new cross-disciplinary course to promote community-engaged research methods. She also works with Q-methodology personality and risk assessments, and enjoys collaborating with academic faculty on community-engaged projects. Prior to joining the Fanning Institute, Brandy has worked and taught at Tulane University, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science and Technology and the College of Education at the University of Georgia. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

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