Region IV Public Health Training Center

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Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on October 19, 2020. Training Overview This presentation will cover the rising rates of STDs in the United States, drivers of these rates and innovative approaches to mitigate these trends. The role of STDs in Ending the HIV Epidemic (EHE) and the impact of COVID-19 on STD trends will also be discussed. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainer Dr. Bolan is Director of the Division of STD Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  A graduate of Dartmouth Medical School, she completed her training in internal medicine at the University of Virginia, in infectious diseases at Tufts New England and Stanford Medical Centers and in medical epidemiology as a CDC EIS officer in the Respiratory and Special Pathogens Branch.  Prior to joining CDC, she served as the Chief of the STD Control Branch at the California Department of Public Health.    Dr. Bolan is a leader in the field of STD Prevention and is recognized for her contributions in applied STD prevention research and implementation of science-based STD programs.  Dr. Bolan has over 175 scientific publications.  She has served on the CDC HIV/STD Prevention Advisory Committee and OID Board of Scientific Counselors, the Executive Committee of ASTDA, and Board of Directors of NCSD and ASHA.   This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on September 29, 2021. Since early 2020, Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities across the country have been subjected to racist physical and verbal attacks sparked by the pandemic. Thousands of incidents have been reported to the Stop AAPI Hate coalition, which consists of the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council (A3PCON), Chinese for Affirmative Action, and the Asian American Studies Department of San Francisco State University. The Stop AAPI Hate coalition has been working to track and respond to incidents of hate, violence, harassment, discrimination, shunning, and child bullying against AAPIs. This webinar will describe partners and investments needed to address racism and discrimination toward AAPI communities and ways in which public health professionals can help stop anti-Asian hate. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainer Manjusha P. Kulkarni (Manju) (she/her) is Executive Director of Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council (A3PCON), a coalition of over forty community-based organizations that serves and represents the 1.5 million Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Los Angeles County.  Manju also serves as a Lecturer in the Asian American Studies Department of UCLA. In March 2020, Manju co-founded Stop AAPI Hate, the nation’s leading aggregator of COVID-19-related hate incidents against AAPIs.  Manju's work has been featured in numerous publications, including the New York Times, CBS News, and CNN, as well as several ethnic media outlets. On March 18, 2021, Manju testified before Congress at the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties on the issue of anti-Asian hate; she shared Stop AAPI Hate data as well as policy recommendations for addressing the current wave of racism and discrimination faced by AAPIs in the U.S. Manju received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Duke University and a Juris Doctor degree from Boston University School of Law.  In 2014, Manju received the White House Champions of Change award from President Obama for her dedication to improving health care access for Asians American communities. About Stop AAPI Hate:  Stop AAPI Hate is a national coalition addressing anti-Asian racism across the U.S. The coalition was founded by the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council (A3PCON), Chinese for Affirmative Action (CAA) and San Francisco State University’s Asian American Studies Department. Between March 19, 2020 and March 31, 2021, Stop AAPI Hate has received 6,603 reported incidents of racism and discrimination targeting Asian Americans across the U.S. Visit stopaapihate.org. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This workshop has limited capacity. If you are unable to enroll, the course might be full. This is an online, interactive workshop on November 11, 2021 from 8:45am-12pm ET. Participants will use Zoom to join with both video and audio. This workshop is sponsored by The Region IV Public Health Training Center. Training Overview “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.” Vibrant workplace culture helps retain staff and improve productivity, while toxic culture does the opposite. Leaders shape both the direction of their organizations and also shape the culture. Successful leaders are self-aware and recognize their roles in shaping culture. They can identify strengths in themselves and others and know how to leverage them to build a productive culture. This workshop uses Gallup’s CliftonStrengths assessment to help emerging and established public health leaders navigate the path of building positive workplace culture through understanding their strengths.   Prior to the workshop, all participants will take the CliftonStrengths assessment and receive descriptions of their top five strengths. These results will be discussed in depth during the workshop through the lens of leadership and creating workplace culture. This workshop also includes use of the Team Strengths Grid, which helps to visualize the collective strengths for teams of all sizes. The workshop will be highly interactive and participatory and will provide avenues to help participants bring CliftonStrengths back to their own teams.   About the Trainer Dr. Ariela Freedman is a strengths-based Learning and Development Consultant with 20 years of experience in community and academic settings. She is a skilled adult educator and has taught a wide range of learners, including public health practitioners, health care professionals, students, nonprofit workers, and community members. Dr. Freedman began her career as a high school English, Drama, and Debate teacher in Chicago. She later directed health programming at Head Start in Minneapolis, worked as an ORISE fellow at CDC, then as an Assistant Research Professor in the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. At Emory, Dr. Freedman taught classes and served as an evaluator to the Emory University Medical School and the Emory Public Health Training Center. As an independent consultant with her business, MavenTree Consulting, Dr. Freedman functions as an organizational coach to help build positive workplace environments, and create, operate, evaluate, sustain, and scale up programs. Dr. Freedman’s toolbox includes strategies from public health, education, business, and the arts, resulting in interactive trainings that are skill-focused and fun. Her approach to teaching includes balancing rigor with reality and focuses on teaching practical skills that can be immediately applied in the workplace. Dr. Freedman has a PhD in Behavioral Sciences and Health Education from Emory University and an MPH from the University of Minnesota. She also has a Master of Arts in Teaching and a BA in English Literature. She is a Gallup Certified Strengths Coach and a certified Positive Discipline Trainer. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on November 11, 2020. Training Overview During the COVID-19 pandemic, long-standing systemic health and social inequities have been exposed and increased the risk of COVID-19 for certain populations. During this webinar we will discuss how systemic racism has historically prevented Latinx communities from accessing healthcare and other economic opportunities. We will discuss the impact COVID-19 is having on the Latinx community and how we must look at the systemic issue of race and health disparities as we move forward. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainers Dr. Valeria Cantos was born and raised in Quito, Ecuador. She completed her medical school in Ecuador, then she moved to Atlanta for her Internal Medicine residency at Emory University. After acting as a year as a Chief Resident, she completed her Infectious Disease fellowship at Emory. She is now an Assistant Professor at the Division of Infectious Diseases at Emory University, and an attending physician at Grady Memorial Hospital, Emory University Hospital, and the Grady Infectious Disease Clinic (IDP). Dr. Paulina Rebolledo was born in Mexico City, Mexico. She completed Internal Medicine specialty, Infectious Disease and Medical Microbiology fellowship at Emory University as well as Masters in Clinical Research. She currently holds dual appointments in the Division of Infectious Disease and Department of Global Health at Emory University and is an attending physician at Grady Memorial Hospital and the Grady Infectious Disease Clinic (IDP).  This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a webinar held in 2013. Training Overview Looking at public health from a business perspective is vital, particularly in this uncertain economic time. Join us for an enlightening discussion on public health business planning with Dr. Stephen Orton. Dr. Orton will provide an overview of public health business planning, including the value of applying business principles to public health, key elements of a strong business plan and case studies where public health agencies/departments have developed successful business plans. The Models of Excellence lecture series highlights current public health issues or topics. The goal of the series is to explore the connection between innovation and public health practice as well as identify ways in which public health practitioners and health science faculty can facilitate the translation of innovation into practice.  The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainer Dr. Stephen Orton, co-author of Public Health Business Planning: A Practical Guide and Deputy Director, Executive Education, with the North Carolina Institute for Public Health at the Gillings School of Global Public Health, UNC-Chapel Hill.  This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a lecture held in 2011. Training Overview The Georgia Meth Project is a large-scale prevention program aimed at reducing Meth use through public service messaging, public policy, and community outreach. Central to the program is a research-based marketing campaign that graphically communicates the risks of Meth use. The Meth Project has been repeatedly cited as a powerful private-sector response to a devastating social problem and was recognized by the White House as one of the nation’s most effective prevention programs. The Georgia Meth Project activities increase awareness of the critical nature of the Meth problem, influencing and escalating public dialogue to find solutions. Coordinating closely with local, state, and federal agencies, the Georgia Meth Project organizes a broad range of community outreach programs that mobilize communities across Georgia to assist in Meth awareness and prevention activities. This lecture will focus on the current state of methamphetamine use in Georgia, the Meth Project model, strategies and partners, and insights that might be incorporated into contemporary public health practice, training and education. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainer Jim Langford Jim Langford, Executive Director and Co-founder of the Georgia Prevention Project (GPP, formerly the Georgia Meth Project), brings many years of business, public service and nonprofit experience to the organization. He has been appointed by five Georgia governors to a variety of commissions and boards in the state. He also is the founder of multiple other nonprofit organizations and initiatives. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

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