Region IV Public Health Training Center

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Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on June 15, 2020. Training Overview In this presentation, we’ll discuss the nature and dynamics of sex and labor trafficking, and the health impact on adults and children.  We’ll review possible indicators of trafficking that may be present under varied conditions, and discuss screening tools that may be helpful in identifying persons at risk of exploitation.  We’ll talk about the trauma-informed, rights-based approach to interacting with trafficked persons, and review resources available to those in need.  Finally, we’ll discuss how the COVID pandemic is expected to impact the dynamics of human trafficking and exacerbate existing risk factors for exploitation. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainer Jordan Greenbaum, MD, received her medical degree from Yale School of Medicine and is board-certified in anatomic and forensic pathology. She served as the medical director of the child protection program at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin from 2001-2006 and the medical director of the Stephanie V. Blank Center for Safe and Healthy Children at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta from 2006-2015. She is the Medical Director of the International Centre for Missing and Exploited Children on their Global Health Initiative. She co-chairs the Education/Training committee for HEAL Trafficking, an organization of professionals working on human trafficking issues.  Her research focuses on designing and validating a screening tool to be used in healthcare settings to identify youth at risk for trafficking/sexual exploitation. She is a long-time member of the International Society on the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect and helps lead their anti-trafficking initiative. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on March 13, 2017. Training Overview This webinar presentation explores refugee resettlement, health surveillance methods that help identify health conditions among newly arriving refugees, and the impact of refugee health from multiple perspectives. During 2016, approximately 80,000 refugees and other entrants were resettled into virtually every state in the US as part of the federal refugee resettlement program.  Refugees bring with them a variety of health conditions and health needs that are important to address in order for them to achieve the self-sufficiency required for success resettlement.  As refugees represent multiple cultures and speak many different languages, integration into local society requires that communities be competent to address the cultural and communication needs of their new community members.  The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainer Ruth M. Carrico, PhD, MSN, APRN, FNP-C, FSHEA, CIC Dr. Carrico is an Associate Professor and Family Nurse Practitioner with the University of Louisville School Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases. She is founding Associate Director of the School of Medicine Global Health Initiative and received healthcare epidemiology training at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in conjunction with the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University in Atlanta and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on October 12, 2021. Training Overview “Although not everyone needs an effective public health system, everyone benefits when it works. Decades of evidence directly link economic prosperity to the health and wellness of people. Investing in economic security without similar investments in the public’s health is short-sighted and ultimately futile. For our communities to experience sustainable economic growth, they must first become physically healthier.” – William E. Cooke, MD, FAAFP, FASAM, AAHIVS, AAFP’s 2019 Family Physician of the Year Dr. Cooke is a physician in a rural, southern Indiana town of Austin, Indiana, and has first-hand knowledge of how the resources and opportunities available to communities impact the health, prosperity, and wellbeing of the people living there.  Discrimination and deindustrialization have left pockets of concentrated poverty, toxic stress, and inequity and created health disadvantages for many.  Unfortunately, our public health system has not risen to the challenge.  In his book, Canary in the Coal Mine: A Forgotten Rural Community, a Hidden Epidemic, and a Lone Doctor Battling for the Life, Health, and Soul of the People, Dr. Cooke discusses these factors and how they came into play in his fight against the opioid epidemic and the worst drug-fueled HIV outbreak ever seen in rural America. In this webinar and based on his experiences in Austin, Dr. Cooke will discuss the need to reinvest in the health and wellness of America and to build an effective public health system that benefits everyone in the community. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on June 10, 2019. Training Overview This webinar presents evidence that religion should be considered among the social determinants of health, based on epidemiological research.  Plausible mechanisms at the individual level are the lower smoking rates and greater social ties of those with religious participation.  At the community level, faith-based organizations engage in partnerships with public health agencies as a source of social capital to promote health and prevent disease, particularly in hard-to-reach populations. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainers Dr. Idler holds additional appointments at Emory at the Rollins School of Public Health, the Center for Ethics, the Graduate Division of Religion of the Laney Graduate School, and the School of Medicine.  She received her Ph.D. from Yale University and attended Union Theological Seminary on a Rockefeller Brothers Fellowship. She studies the influence of attitudes, beliefs, and social connections on health, including the effect of self-ratings of health on mortality and disability, and the impact of religious participation on health and the timing of death among the elderly. Ms. Kiser joined the Interfaith Health Program in 1993 during its first seven years at The Carter Center and continues that work now at the school of public health.  She teaches interdisciplinary courses at Emory in faith and health, religion and development, and social justice.  Ms. Kiser has led the Academic Programs Working Group for Emory’s Religion and Public Health Collaborative. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on August 31, 2020. Training Overview As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, schools across the country are deciding how to begin the 2020-21 school year, whether for in-person instruction, virtual learning, or a hybrid approach. In this webinar, health and education experts from the Center for American Progress will discuss the current state of school reopenings, considerations for local officials making decisions about reopening, and related health and education research. The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainers Maura Calsyn is the managing director of Health Policy at American Progress. In this capacity, she plays a leading role in American Progress’ health policy development and advocacy efforts. She has authored and co-authored work published in The New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA Internal Medicine, U.S. News & World Report, and The Hill. Scott Sargrad is the vice president of K-12 Education Policy at American Progress. Prior to joining American Progress, Sargrad served as deputy assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education at the U.S. Department of Education under then-Education Secretary Arne Duncan, as well as the acting director of the Office of School Turnaround. He joined the Education Department in 2009 as a presidential management fellow in the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services and also worked as a senior policy adviser in the Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development.  This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

Note: This is a recording of a webinar held on September 2, 2020. Training Overview This webinar will focus on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the Black community and discuss how stigma, disease prevention & awareness, and access to care & treatment play a pivotal role in elimination of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on the national, state, and local level.    The course contains two modules: a content module and a resources and evaluation module. After accessing both modules, learners will earn a certificate of completion. When the certificate is available, learners will see a Certificate button on their dashboard. This recording is approximately 90 minutes. There are no prerequisites. Participants will need a broadband internet connection (Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox are preferred browsers) and computer speakers. For technical support, please contact emoryphtc@emory.edu. About the Trainer Mrs. Kiara Dale-Adenola currently serves as Chairwoman for the Black Treatment Advocates Network of Big Bend. The Black Treatment Advocates Network (BTAN) is a national network of HIV/AIDS stakeholders including providers, community members and leaders, educators, and people living with HIV/AIDS, who mobilize Black communities across the country to confront HIV. The Black AIDS Institute provides technical assistance to the BTAN chapters in various forms including content development and provision. This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB6HP31680, Public Health Training Centers for $4,348,992. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government. Read More

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